We Need Your Help…

Today, our cofounders/mother-daughter team, Jody Daitchman & Chelsea Laliberte are heading to Springfield, IL to testify for HB1466 AKA “Lali’s Law” which expands Narcan access to pharmacies! Any layperson 18+ can walk into a pharmacy to get training and equipped in this lifesaving drug. Imagine how many people today alone will stand in line at a local CVS or Walgreens to fill their opioid script. With this bill’s passage, imagine how many more could get the OD antidote along with their meds. PLEASE SHOW YOUR SUPPORT and submit public comments. Instructions are attached.

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Our Mission: How One Family’s Lack of Knowledge Inspired the Power to Know

We were proud to be recently featured in the Daily Herald. Their article highlighted Chelsea Laliberte, our Executive Director and the work she provides to the community. Please take a look at the article here: http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20141226/news/141228992/

All photos provided by Daily Herald:

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Remembering Alex on the 6th Anniversary of His Death

Message from our Executive Director, Chelsea Laliberte on the 6th anniversary of Alex “Lali” Laliberte’s death:

alex_chels6 years ago today, Alex Laliberte took his last breath. From that moment on, all who knew him were changed in different ways. I won’t attempt to detail that because no experiences were exactly the same. The only perspective I can speak of is my own.

I woke up today like I do every morning, grateful for this life. A few years ago, I didn’t know it was possible to feel contentme

nt of this kind. I lived in a bubble in Los Angeles where I was still trying to figure out who I was far away from where it all began. It was really tough, but it was where I forged the strength to accept Alex’s fate and myself, flaws and all. The culmination of that experience was this: when I was able to start really fully dealing with Alex’s death, I found myself again. Instead of being mad at him or obsessed with trying to analyze every little idiosyncratic detail of the last year of his life, I started talking to him. Soon enough, he started speaking back through songs, experiences, feelings, dreams, relationships, food, culture. He was there. He still is.

It took a long time to get here but I now remember Alex not as this character we talk about because of his choices or his illness, but as a person who brought light to many people, especially me. I am LUCKY to have had Alex for a brother. His death may have been tragic, but don’t be fooled by his way out. There was a lot of worry, but he was NOT a burden. Those 20 years were spent in the best of company. So, I am going to take today to express gratitude to him.

Alex, thank you for your kindness and youthful spirit. Thank you for your sensitivity and intuition. You always knew how to make things better, sometimes just by smiling. Thank you for being authentic and unafraid to express yourself creatively; music was your religion. Thank you for always saying “yes”; your dedication to your family couldn’t be altered. Thank you for your huge heart of gold; always looking for someone to help or relieve. Thank you for trying. Trying to fight what your mind and body were telling you to do, trying to summon the strength to get the words out. Thank you for never wanting to leave a room angry and always saying “I love you.” I know you meant it. Thank you for taking care of me when I was sick or talking me down from an emotional precipice by simply saying “don’t worry about it.” Thank you for not taking life too seriously, it helped make our life together so much more enjoyable. Thank you for going the extra mile to get a laugh, even if it almost left you detained in Mexico or stuck at a gas station in the middle of nowhere. Thank you for keeping secrets. Thank you for showing me that sometimes silence is enough.

Thank you for waking me up in the morning with the strongest fire in my belly. Thank you for helping me to sleep soundly knowing that the work we are doing is affecting change by saving lives and enlightening people. Thank you for everything you were and everything you are. At the end of a long day, all I have to do is look at your face and know that everything is going to be alright. Til we meet again, I will always be thankful. Save a seat for me.

“People typically do more research when shopping for a new car than when seeking treatment for addiction.”

Addiction – to anything – can be a very confusing disease to grasp even for those who are suffering from it. When the active user or their loved ones are discovering what addiction is and learning to accept its presence in their lives, identifying an appropriate course of action to treat the addiction can be an extremely daunting task. Many people think that a typical 30-day inpatient treatment program from a 12-step based facility is the way to go. They think, “this is the magic bullet that will rid my loved one of addiction forever.” To their disappointment and surprise, when relapse might occur following the completion of a program, they blame the facility or in most cases, scold/shame/guilt their loved one for not being “able to just stop.”

Understanding addiction as a disease is imperative to treating it. Drugs become like food or water to those who are dependent upon them. In order to appropriately treat the disease, each person must be provided with the customized plan designed for them. So what do you do when 12-step is the common practice but not what is needed for you or your loved one? You consider what other options are out there. Understanding effective treatment addiction is the difference between seeing long-term, positive recovery results and experiencing a long and winding road of relapse and discouragement. Click here to read this article written by Jane Brody on this very interesting topic.

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